Wednesday, June 14, 2006

Comfortable Deceptions

What people hate is not being deceived, but the bad hostile consequences of certain kinds of deception.

In a sense they want the truth. They want the agreeable life-preserving consequences of truth. But they are indifferent to pure knowledge, which has no immediate consequences. They are even hostile to possibly damaging and destructive truths.


Friedrich Nietzsche
"On Truth and Lie in an Extra-Moral Sense"
(a fragment published posthumously)
1873

Nature Gone Wild

She threw away the key. And woe to the calamitous curiosity which might peer just once through a crack in the chamber of consciousness and look down, and sense that humanity rests upon the merciless, the greedy, the insatiable, the murderous, in the indifference of its ignorance---hanging in dreams on the back of a tiger.

In view of all this, where in the world does the urge for truth come from?

Friedrich Nietzsche
"On Truth and Lie in an Extra-Moral Sense"
(a fragment published posthumously) 1873

The Tadpole Channel

The constant fluttering around the single flame of vanity is so much the rule and the law that almost nothing is as incomprehensible than how an honest and pure urge for truth could make an appearance among human beings.

They are deeply immersed in illusions and dream images. Their eye glides only over the surface of things and sees "forms". Nowhere does their feeling lead into truth, but contents itself with the reception of stimuli, playing, as it were, blindman's bluff on the backs of things.

Friedrich Nietzsche
"On Truth and Lie in an Extra-Moral Sense"
(a fragment published posthumously) 1873

Bonfire of the Evanescent

That arrogance which goes with knowledge and feeling, which shrouds the eyes and senses in a blinding fog, therefore deceives humanity about the value of existence by containing the most flattering evaluation of knowledge itself. Its most universal effect is deception.

Friedrich Nietzsche
"On Truth and Lie in an Extra-Moral Sense"
(a fragment published postumously) 1873

A 1-Minute Intellectual History

How miserable, now shadowy and flighty, how aimless and arbitrary the human intellect appears in nature. There have been eternities when it didn't exist. And when it's done for again, nothing will have happened.

Because this intellect has no further goal that would lead beyond human life.

It's human. And only its owner and producer gives it such importance, as if the world pivoted around it.

Friedrich Nietzsche
"On Truth and Lie in an Extra-Moral Sense"
(A fragment published posthumously)
1873

Retroactive Indicative

In some remote corner of the universe, poured out and glittering in innumerable solar systems, there once was a star on which clever animals invented knowledge.

That was the most arrogant and mendacious minute of world history.

Yet only a minute.

After nature had drawn a few breaths, the star grew cold, and the clever animals had to die.


Friedrich Nietzsche
"On Truth and Lie in an Extra-Moral Sense", 1873, posthumously