Saturday, July 16, 2011

Ed Feser on The Philosopher

"How significant is Aristotle? Well, I wouldn't want to exaggerate, so let me put it this way: Abandoning Aristotelianism, as the founders of modern philosophy did, was the single greatest mistake ever made in the entire history of Western thought. More than any other intellectual factor . . . this abandonment has contributed to the civilizational crisis through which the West has been living for several centuries, and which has accelerated massively in the last century or so. It is implicated in the disintegration of confidence in the rational justifiability of morality and religious belief, in the widespread assumption that a scientific picture of human nature entails that free will is an illusion; in the belief that there is a "mind-body" problem and that the only scientifically and philosophically respectable solution to it is some version of materialism; in the proliferation of varieties of relativism and irrationalism, and also of scientism and hyper-rationalism; in the modern world's corrosive skepticism about the legitimacy of any authority, and the radical individualism and collectivism that have followed in its wake; and in the intellectual and practical depersonalization of man that all of this has entailed, and which has in turn led to mass murder on a scale unparalleled in human history."

--Edward Feser, The Last Superstition

An Epistemic Chance for Natural Selection

Maybe most people would still say they believe in God, if they had to answer a questionnaire. But if you have to ask people pointed questions for them to acknowledge belief in God, that's not serious conviction. It's the vestigial remains of their grandparents' religion.

--Redacted from Gordon Clark in 1952. A Christian View of Men and Things, Grand Rapids MI: Baker, 1981, page 13.

To Be Rather Than To Seem

"You must more than try, Mrs. Hudson. You must succeed."

--Sherlock Holmes